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Relationship Between the Japanese Version of the Montreal Cognitive Assessment and PET Imaging in Subjects with Mild Cognitive Impairment

Author(s):

Atsuko Eguchi, Noriyuki Kimura*, Yasuhiro Aso, Kenichi Yabuuchi, Masato Ishibashi, Daiji Hori, Yuuki Sasaki, Atsuhito Nakamichi, Souhei Uesugi, Mika Jikumaru, Kaori Sumi, Tsuyoshi Shimomura and Etsuro Matsubara   Pages 1 - 8 ( 8 )

Abstract:


Background: The Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) test has high sensitivity and specificity for detecting mild cognitive impairment or early dementia. How the MoCA score relates to findings of positron emission tomography imaging, however, remains unclear.

Objective: This prospective study examined the relationship between the Japanese version of the MoCA (MoCA-J) test and brain amyloid deposition or cerebral glucose metabolism among subjects with mild cognitive impairment.

Method: A total of 125 subjects with mild cognitive impairment underwent the MoCA-J test, and amyloid- and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose- positron emission tomography. Linear correlation analysis and multiple linear regression analysis were conducted to investigate the relationship between the MoCA-J score and demographic characteristics, amyloid deposition, and cerebral glucose metabolism. Moreover, Statistical Parametric Mapping 8 was used for a voxel-wise regression analysis of the MoCA-J score and cerebral glucose metabolism.

Results: The MoCA-J score significantly correlated with age, years of education, and the Mini-Mental State Examination score. After adjusting for age, sex, and education, the MoCA-J score significantly correlated negatively with amyloid retention (β= -0.174, p= 0.031) and positively with cerebral glucose metabolism (β= 0.183, p= 0.044). Statistical Parametric Mapping showed that Japanese version of MoCA score correlated with glucose metabolism in the bilateral frontal and parietal lobes, and the left precuneus.

Conclusion: The total MoCA-J score correlated with amyloid deposition and frontal and parietal glucose metabolism in subjects with mild cognitive impairment. Our findings support the usefulness of the MoCA-J test for screening subjects at high risk for Alzheimer’s disease.

Keywords:

Mild cognitive impairment, prospective study, Japanese version of the Montreal Cognitive Assessment, Amyloid positron emission tomography, 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography, Brain regions.

Affiliation:

Department of Neurology, Oita University, Faculty of Medicine, Yufu, Oita 879-5593, Department of Neurology, Oita University, Faculty of Medicine, Yufu, Oita 879-5593, Department of Neurology, Oita University, Faculty of Medicine, Yufu, Oita 879-5593, Department of Neurology, Oita University, Faculty of Medicine, Yufu, Oita 879-5593, Department of Neurology, Oita University, Faculty of Medicine, Yufu, Oita 879-5593, Department of Neurology, Oita University, Faculty of Medicine, Yufu, Oita 879-5593, Department of Neurology, Oita University, Faculty of Medicine, Yufu, Oita 879-5593, Department of Neurology, Oita University, Faculty of Medicine, Yufu, Oita 879-5593, Department of Neurology, Oita University, Faculty of Medicine, Yufu, Oita 879-5593, Department of Neurology, Oita University, Faculty of Medicine, Yufu, Oita 879-5593, Department of Neurology, Oita University, Faculty of Medicine, Yufu, Oita 879-5593, Department of Neurosurgery, Oita University, Faculty of Medicine, Yufu, Oita 879-5593, Department of Neurology, Oita University, Faculty of Medicine, Yufu, Oita 879-5593



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