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Cornel Iridoid Glycoside Suppresses Tau Hyperphosphorylation and Aggregation in a Mouse Model of Tauopathy through Increasing Activity of PP2A

[ Vol. 16 , Issue. 14 ]

Author(s):

Denglei Ma, Yi Luo, Rui Huang, Zirun Zhao, Qi Wang, Lin Li* and Lan Zhang*   Pages 1316 - 1331 ( 16 )

Abstract:


Background: rTg4510 mice are transgenic mice expressing P301L mutant tau and have been developed as an animal model of tauopathy including Alzheimer’s Disease (AD). Cornel Iridoid Glycoside (CIG) is an active ingredient extracted from Cornus officinalis, a traditional Chinese herb. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effects of CIG on tau pathology and underlying mechanisms using rTg4510 mice.

Methods: The cognitive functions were detected by Morris water maze and objective recognition tests. Western blotting and immunofluorescence were conducted to measure the levels of phosphorylated tau and related proteins. Serine/threonine phosphatase assay was applied to detect the activity of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A).

Results: Intragastric administration of CIG for 3 months improved learning and memory abilities, prevented neuronal and synapse loss, halted brain atrophy, elevated levels of synaptic proteins, protected cytoskeleton, reduced tau hyperphosphorylation and aggregation in the brain of rTg4510 mice. In the mechanism studies, CIG increased the activity of PP2A, elevated the methylation of PP2A catalytic C (PP2Ac) at leucine 309, decreased the phosphorylation of PP2Ac at tyrosine 307, and increased protein expression of leucine carboxyl methyltransferase 1 (LCMT-1), protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B), and protein phosphatase 2A phosphatase activator (PTPA) in the brain of rTg4510 mice.

Conclusion: CIG might have the potential to treat tauopathy such as AD via activating PP2A.

Keywords:

Cornel iridoid glycoside, rTg4510 mouse, tauopathy, Alzheimer’s disease, tau phosphorylation, protein phosphatase 2A.

Affiliation:

Department of Pharmacy, Xuanwu Hospital of Capital Medical University, National Clinical Research Center for Geriatric Diseases, Beijing Engineering Research Center for Nervous System Drugs, Beijing Institute for Brain Disorders, Key Laboratory for Neurodegenerative Diseases of Ministry of Education, Beijing 100053, Department of Pharmacy, Xuanwu Hospital of Capital Medical University, National Clinical Research Center for Geriatric Diseases, Beijing Engineering Research Center for Nervous System Drugs, Beijing Institute for Brain Disorders, Key Laboratory for Neurodegenerative Diseases of Ministry of Education, Beijing 100053, Department of Pharmacy, Xuanwu Hospital of Capital Medical University, National Clinical Research Center for Geriatric Diseases, Beijing Engineering Research Center for Nervous System Drugs, Beijing Institute for Brain Disorders, Key Laboratory for Neurodegenerative Diseases of Ministry of Education, Beijing 100053, Renaissance School of Medicine at Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794, Institute of Clinical Pharmacology, Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine, Guangzhou 510006, Department of Pharmacy, Xuanwu Hospital of Capital Medical University, National Clinical Research Center for Geriatric Diseases, Beijing Engineering Research Center for Nervous System Drugs, Beijing Institute for Brain Disorders, Key Laboratory for Neurodegenerative Diseases of Ministry of Education, Beijing 100053, Department of Pharmacy, Xuanwu Hospital of Capital Medical University, National Clinical Research Center for Geriatric Diseases, Beijing Engineering Research Center for Nervous System Drugs, Beijing Institute for Brain Disorders, Key Laboratory for Neurodegenerative Diseases of Ministry of Education, Beijing 100053



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